2011 Topics descriptions

Accommodation type

The type of accommodation used or available for use by an individual household. Examples include the whole of a terraced house, or a flat in a purpose-built block of flats.

 

Adult lifestage (alternative adult definition)

Adult lifestage classifies people in households by age, the presence of dependent children in the household, age of the youngest dependent child, and the number of people in the household. The exact categorisation used depends on the person's age.

 

Adults in household, number of

This derived variable provides a count of the number of employed adults in a household. An adult in a household is defined as any person who is not a dependent child. This definition is used in most results from the 2011 Census. In results where a different definition is used, it is clearly indicated.

 

Age

Age is derived from the date of birth question and is a person's age at their last birthday, at 27 March 2011. Dates of birth that imply an age over 115 are treated as invalid and the person's age is imputed. Infants less than one year old are classified as 0 years of age.

 

Alternative population

Alternative populations
A non-UK born short-term resident is defined as anyone living in England and Wales who was born outside the UK, who intended to stay in the UK for a period of between 3 and 12 months.
The workday population of an area is defined as all usual residents aged 16 and above who are in employment and whose workplace is in the area, and all other usual residents of any age who are not in employment but are resident in the area. People who work mainly at or from home or do not have a fixed place of work are included in their area of their usual residence.
The following population groups are excluded from the workday population of an area: Those living in England and Wales but working in Scotland, Northern Ireland, outside the UK or on offshore installations. Those with a place of work in England and Wales but who are not usually resident in England and Wales, and Short-term residents

 

Arrival in the UK, age upon

The age of arrival in the UK is derived from the date that a person last arrived to live in the UK and their age. Short visits away from the UK are not counted in determining the date that a person last arrived.
Age of arrival is only applicable to usual residents who were not born in the UK. It does not include usual residents born in the UK who have emigrated and since returned, these are recorded in the category 'born in the UK'.

 

Bedrooms, number of

The number of bedrooms in a household's accommodation. A bedroom is defined as any room that was intended to be used as a bedroom when the property was built, or any room that has been permanently converted for use as a bedroom. It also includes all rooms intended for use as a bedroom even if not being used as a bedroom at the time of the census. Bedsits and studio flats are counted as having one bedroom. The number of bedrooms is not available for household spaces with no usual residents.

 

Bedrooms, number of persons per bedrooms in household

The number of persons per bedroom is equal to the number of usual residents in a household divided by the number of bedrooms in that household's accommodation. A bedroom is defined as any room that was intended to be used as a bedroom when the property was built, or any room that has been permanently converted for use as a bedroom. It also includes all rooms intended for use as a bedroom even if not being used as a bedroom at the time of the census.

 

Bedrooms, occupancy rating

Occupancy rating provides a measure of whether a household's accommodation is overcrowded or under occupied. There are two measures of occupancy rating, one based on the number of rooms in a household's accommodation, and one based on the number of bedrooms. The ages of the household members and their relationships to each other are used to derive the number of rooms/bedrooms they require, based on a standard formula. The number of rooms/bedrooms required is subtracted from the number of rooms/bedrooms in the household's accommodation to obtain the occupancy rating. An occupancy rating of -1 implies that a household has one fewer room/bedroom than required, whereas +1 implies that they have one more room/bedroom than the standard requirement.

 

Car or van availability

The number of cars or vans that are owned, or available for use, by one or more members of a household. This includes company cars and vans that are available for private use. It does not include motorbikes or scooters, or any cars or vans belonging to visitors. The count of cars or vans in an area relates only to households. Cars or vans used by residents of communal establishments are not counted. Households with 10 to 20 cars or vans are counted as having only 1.
Responses indicating a number of cars or vans greater than 20 were treated as invalid and a value was imputed.

 

Care (unpaid), provision of

A person is a provider of unpaid care if they look after or give help or support to family members, friends, neighbours or others because of long-term physical or mental ill health or disability, or problems related to old age. This does not include any activities as part of paid employment. No distinction is made about whether any care that a person provides is within their own household or outside the household, so no explicit link can be made about whether the care provided is for a person within the household who has poor general health or a long-term health problem or disability.

 

Central heating in household, type of

A household's accommodation is classified as having central heating if it is present in some or all rooms (whether used or not). Central heating is classified by type, as shown in the classification table. Other central heating includes solar, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) or other bottled gas. This information is not available for household spaces with no usual residents.

 

Children, age of

Age is derived from the date of birth question and is a person's age at their last birthday, at 27 March 2011. Dates of birth that imply an age over 115 are treated as invalid and the person's age is imputed. Infants less than one year old are classified as 0 years of age.

 

Communal establishment management and type

A communal establishment is an establishment providing managed residential accommodation. 'Managed' in this context means full-time or part-time supervision of the accommodation
Types of communal establishment include Sheltered accommodation units where fewer than 50 per cent of the units in the establishment have their own cooking facilities, or similar accommodation where residents have their own rooms, but the main meal is provided. If half or more possess their own facilities for cooking (regardless of use) all units in the whole establishment are treated as separate households.
Small hotels, guest houses, bed and breakfasts, inns and pubs with residential accommodation with room for 10 or more guests (excluding the owner/manager and his/her family).
All accommodation provided solely for students (during term-time). This includes university-owned cluster flats, houses and apartments located within student villages, and similar accommodation owned by a private company and provided solely for students. (University-owned student houses that were difficult to identify and not clearly located with other student residences are treated as households, and houses rented to students by private landlords are also treated as households.) Accommodation available only to students may include a small number of care-taking or maintenance staff, or academic staff.
Accommodation available only to nurses. This includes cluster flats and similar accommodation, provided solely for nurses. Nurses' accommodation on a hospital site that does not also contain patients is treated as a separate communal establishment from the hospital (and not categorised as a hospital), so that nurses are treated as 'residents' and not 'resident staff' or 'patients'. This ensures consistency with similar nurses' accommodation not on a hospital site.

 

Communal establishment, position in

A usual resident of a communal establishment is either a resident of the establishment, a member of staff who is resident in the establishment, or a family member of staff that is a resident in the establishment.

 

Concealed family

A concealed family is one that does not include the Household Reference Person (HRP). An example of this is shown below:
George and Amy live at the same address as their daughter Emily and her husband and daughter. Because Emily is not a dependent child and has her own family, there are two families in this household.
Family one is George and wife Amy. George is the Family Reference Person (FRP).
Family two is daughter Emily, husband Simon and their daughter Eve. Emily is the FRP.
As there is more than one family in the household, The FRPs are prioritised to decide who the HRP is. In this household, George is the HRP.
This means that Emily's family is a 'concealed family', their HRP is George, and they will be included as part of his household in relevant outputs.

 

Country of birth

Country of birth is the country in which a person was born. The country of birth question included six tick-box responses: one for each of the four parts of the UK (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland); one for the Republic of Ireland; and one for 'Elsewhere'.
Where a person ticked 'elsewhere', they were asked to write in the current name of the country in which they were born. Responses are assigned codes based on the National Statistics Country Classification.
The grouping of countries within the classification is broadly regional, but takes into account the grouping of European Union (EU) countries. Countries in the EU are grouped into those that were EU members in March 2001, and those that became members (accession countries) between April 2001 and March 2011 as part of the EU enlargement process.
When a person's written response to the country of birth question was a former country name, and the country that it relates to no longer exists and is not wholly contained within the geographic boundary of a current country, the response was coded to one of the additional categories contained in the 'Former country' grouping. For example, 'Czechoslovakia' was coded to 'Czechoslovakia not otherwise specified'.

 

Country of birth (additional categories)

Country of birth is the country in which a person was born.
This topic records whether the person was born in or if they were not born in a country

 

Country of birth (detailed)

Country of birth is the country in which a person was born. The country of birth question included six tick-box responses: one for each of the four parts of the UK (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland); one for the Republic of Ireland; and one for 'Elsewhere'.
Where a person ticked 'elsewhere', they were asked to write in the current name of the country in which they were born. Responses are assigned codes based on the National Statistics Country Classification.
The grouping of countries within the classification is broadly regional, but takes into account the grouping of European Union (EU) countries. Countries in the EU are grouped into those that were EU members in March 2001, and those that became members (accession countries) between April 2001 and March 2011 as part of the EU enlargement process.
When a person's written response to the country of birth question was a former country name, and the country that it relates to no longer exists and is not wholly contained within the geographic boundary of a current country, the response was coded to one of the additional categories contained in the 'Former country' grouping. For example, 'Czechoslovakia' was coded to 'Czechoslovakia not otherwise specified'.

 

Country of birth UK

Country of birth is the country in which a person was born. The country of birth question included six tick-box responses: one for each of the four parts of the UK (England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland); one for the Republic of Ireland; and one for 'Elsewhere'.
Where a person ticked 'elsewhere', they were asked to write in the current name of the country in which they were born. Responses are assigned codes based on the National Statistics Country Classification.
The grouping of countries within the classification is broadly regional, but takes into account the grouping of European Union (EU) countries. Countries in the EU are grouped into those that were EU members in March 2001, and those that became members (accession countries) between April 2001 and March 2011 as part of the EU enlargement process.
When a person's written response to the country of birth question was a former country name, and the country that it relates to no longer exists and is not wholly contained within the geographic boundary of a current country, the response was coded to one of the additional categories contained in the 'Former country' grouping. For example, 'Czechoslovakia' was coded to 'Czechoslovakia not otherwise specified'.

 

Dependent child, age of youngest

Age of Youngest Dependent Child Age is derived from the date of birth question and is a person's age at their last birthday, at 27 March 2011. Dates of birth that imply an age over 115 are treated as invalid and the person's age is imputed. Infants less than one year old are classified as 0 years of age.
A dependent child is any person aged 0 to 15 in a household (whether or not in a family) or a person aged 16 to 18 in full-time education and living in a family with his or her parent(s) or grandparent(s). It does not include any people aged 16 to 18 who have a spouse, partner or child living in the household.

 

Dependent children

A dependent child is any person aged 0 to 15 in a household (whether or not in a family) or a person aged 16 to 18 in full-time education and living in a family with his or her parent(s) or grandparent(s). It does not include any people aged 16 to 18 who have a spouse, partner or child living in the household.

 

Dependent children in family

A dependent child is any person aged 0 to 15 in a household (whether or not in a family) or a person aged 16 to 18 who's in full-time education and living in a family with his or her parent(s) or grandparent(s). It does not include any people aged 16 to 18 who have a spouse, partner or child living in the household.
A family is defined as a group of people who are: a married, same-sex civil partnership, or cohabiting couple, with or without child(ren); a lone parent with child(ren); a married, same-sex civil partnership, or cohabiting couple with grandchild(ren) but with no children present from the intervening generation; or a single grandparent with grandchild(ren) but no children present from the intervening generation. Children in couple families need not belong to both members of the couple. For single or couple grandparents with grandchildren present, the children of the grandparent(s) may also be present if they are not the parents or grandparents of the youngest generation present.

 

Dependent children, age of

A dependent child is any person aged 0 to 15 in a household (whether or not in a family) or a person aged 16 to 18 who's in full-time education and living in a family with his or her parent(s) or grandparent(s). It does not include any people aged 16 to 18 who have a spouse, partner or child living in the household.

 

Deprivation, classification of household

The dimensions of deprivation used to classify households are indicators based on four selected household characteristics. A household is deprived in a dimension if they meet one or more of the following conditions:
 
Employment: where any member of a household, who is not a full-time student, is either unemployed or long-term sick.
 
Education: no person in the household has at least level 2 education (see highest level of qualification), and no person aged 16-18 is a full-time student.
 
Health and disability: any person in the household has general health that is 'bad' or 'very bad' or has a long term health problem.
 
Housing: the household's accommodation is either overcrowded, with an occupancy rating -1 or less, or is in a shared dwelling, or has no central heating.  
 
A household is classified as being deprived in none, or one to four of these dimensions in any combination.

 

Dwelling type

A household's accommodation (a household space) is defined as being in a shared dwelling if it has accommodation type 'part of a converted or shared house', not all the rooms (including bathroom and toilet, if any) are behind a door that only that household can use and there is at least one other such household space at the same address with which it can be combined to form the shared dwelling. If any of these conditions is not met, the household space forms an unshared dwelling. Therefore a dwelling can consist of one household space (an unshared dwelling) or two or more household spaces (a shared dwelling).

 

Economic activity

Economic activity relates to whether or not a person who was aged 16 to 74 was working or looking for work in the week before census. Rather than a simple indicator of whether or not someone was currently in employment, it provides a measure of whether or not a person was an active participant in the labour market.
A person's economic activity is derived from their 'activity last week'. This is an indicator of their status or availability for employment - whether employed, unemployed, or their status if not employed and not seeking employment. Additional information included in the economic activity classification is also derived from information about the number of hours a person works and their type of employment - whether employed or self-employed.
The census concept of economic activity is compatible with the standard for economic status defined by the International Labour Organisation (ILO). It is one of a number of definitions used internationally to produce accurate and comparable statistics on employment, unemployment and economic status.

 

Economic activity of household reference persons

Economic activity relates to whether or not a person who was aged 16 to 74 was working or looking for work in the week before census. Rather than a simple indicator of whether or not someone was currently in employment, it provides a measure of whether or not a person was an active participant in the labour market.
A person's economic activity is derived from their 'activity last week'. This is an indicator of their status or availability for employment - whether employed, unemployed, or their status if not employed and not seeking employment. Additional information included in the economic activity classification is also derived from information about the number of hours a person works and their type of employment - whether employed or self-employed.
The census concept of economic activity is compatible with the standard for economic status defined by the International Labour Organisation (ILO). It is one of a number of definitions used internationally to produce accurate and comparable statistics on employment, unemployment and economic status.
The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.

 

English as a household language

This variable describes whether English is used as a main language in a household.

 

English, proficiency in

Proficiency in English language classifies people whose main language is not English (or not English or Welsh in Wales) according to their ability to speak English. A person is classified in one of the categories: can speak English very well; can speak English well; cannot speak English well; or cannot speak English.
This question was handled slightly differently in the England and Wales censuses. In the English census a tick box was used in Question 18, asking "What is your main language?", giving the option of "English" or "Other".
In the Welsh census, a tick box was used in Question 18, asking "What is your main language?", giving the option of "English or Welsh" or "Other".
Those who ticked "other" would be asked about their ability to speak English.
A consequence of this is that a person who reports their main language to be Welsh and completed the Welsh census, will not be asked about their ability to speak English. Whereas a person who indicates that their main language is Welsh and lives in England would be asked about "their ability to speak English.
Copies of the census forms can be found at: census forms.

 

Ethnic group

Ethnic group classifies people according to their own perceived ethnic group and cultural background.

 

Ethnic group (detailed)

Ethnic group classifies people according to their own perceived ethnic group and cultural background.

 

Ethnic group (write-in responses)

Ethnic group classifies people according to their own perceived ethnic group and cultural background.
This topic contains ethnic group write-in responses without reference to the five broad ethnic group categories, eg, all Irish people, irrespective of whether they are White, Mixed/multiple ethnic groups, Asian/Asian British, Black/African/Caribbean/Black British or Other ethnic group, are in the "Irish" response category. This topic was created as part of the commissioned table processing.

 

Ethnic group of Household reference person

Ethnic group of Household reference person
Ethnic group classifies people according to their own perceived ethnic group and cultural background.
The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.

 

Ethnic group UK

Ethnic group classifies people according to their own perceived ethnic group and cultural background.
Due to question and response category differences in the country specific ethnic group question asked in the 2011 Censuses of the UK, some responses are not directly comparable. The UK output on ethnic group is therefore presented using a high level classification as recommended by the ONS 'Primary Standards for Harmonised Concepts and Questions for Social Data sources'.
White -This category could include Polish responses from the country specific question for Scotland which would have been outputted to 'Other White' and then included under 'White' for UK (also see Gypsy, Traveller and Irish Traveller). 'White Africans' may also have been recorded under 'Other White' and then included under 'White' for UK.
Gypsy / Traveller / Irish Traveller -For Northern Ireland, 'Irish Traveller' is collected under its own ethnic group. There are differences in data collection across the UK for 'Gypsy, Traveller or Irish Traveller', which make it difficult to produce a UK estimate. Gypsy, Traveller or Irish Traveller is collected in England and Wales and 'Gypsy/Traveller' is collected in Scotland and they are both output under 'White'.
However, if there is a need to show a UK output for, 'Gypsy, Traveller or Irish Traveller'(and the numbers are not small or disclosive,) the responses from the GB questions can be combined with the responses from the 'Irish Traveller' category from Northern Ireland. Northern Ireland's framework for monitoring minority ethnic and migrant people' published by the Office of the First Minister and deputy First Minister in July 2011 recommends that Roma is categorised under 'Other ethnic group'.
This is because there is a distinct category for Irish Travellers, who by law (Race Relations Order) are categorised as an ethnic group in their own right. Roma is not a subset of the Irish Traveller group and the need is to have accurate data on both Roma and on Irish Travellers).
Mixed / Multiple Ethnic Groups - This classification isn't broken down for the country specific question for Scotland.
Black / African / Caribbean / Black British - Differences in the terminology and data collection of the country specific Scotland question make these categories difficult to compare. The 'African' category in the Scottish question is presented in a separate section to the 'Caribbean' or 'Black' category, however, under the harmonised output these two categories are output as part of 'Black/African/Caribbean/Black British'. The African categories used in Scotland could potentially capture'White/Asian/Other Africa' in addition to 'Black' identities.

 

Ethnic groups, multiple

Multiple ethnic groups classifies households by the diversity in ethnic group of household members in different relationships - for example, different ethnic groups between generations or within partnerships.

 

Family reference person, age of

Age of family reference person: Age is derived from the date of birth question and is a person's age at their last birthday, at 27 March 2011. Dates of birth that imply an age over 115 are treated as invalid and the person's age is imputed. Infants less than one year old are classified as 0 years of age.

The Family Reference Person (FRP) is identified by criteria based on the family make up.
In a lone parent family it is taken to be the lone parent.
In a couple family, the FRP is chosen from the two people in the couple on the basis of their economic activity (in the priority order: full-time job, part-time job, unemployed, retired, other).
If both people have the same economic activity, the FRP is identified as the elder of the two or, if they are the same age, the first member of the couple on the form.

 

Family status

A family is defined as a group of people who are:
-a married, same-sex civil partnership, or cohabiting couple, with or without child(ren),
-a lone parent with child(ren),
-a married, same-sex civil partnership, or cohabiting couple with grandchild(ren) but with no children present from the intervening generation,
-or a single grandparent with grandchild(ren) but no children present from the intervening generation.
Children in couple families need not belong to both members of the couple.
For single or couple grandparents with grandchildren present, the children of the grandparent(s) may also be present if they are not the parents or grandparents of the youngest generation present.

 

General health

General health is a self-assessment of a person's general state of health. People were asked to assess whether their health was very good, good, fair, bad or very bad. This assessment is not based on a person's health over any specified period of time.

 

Hours worked

The number of hours that a person aged 16 to 74, in employment in the week before the census, worked in their main job. This includes paid and unpaid overtime.

 

Household composition

Household composition classifies households according to the relationships between the household members. Households consisting of one family and no other usual residents are classified according to the type of family (married, same-sex civil partnership or cohabiting couple family, or lone parent family) and the number of dependent children. Other households are classified by the number of people, the number of dependent children, or whether the household consists only of students or only of people aged 65 and over.

 

Household composition (alternative child and adult definitions)

This derived variable describes households in an alternative way to the classification used in most of the standard tables (see Household composition).
It defines households by the age of the people in them. It does not take into account the relationships between people in households. For the purposes of this classification, an 'adult' is defined as any person aged 16 or over and a 'child' is defined as any person aged under 16.

 

Household lifestage

Household lifestage classifies households according to:
1. the age of the Household Reference Person (HRP), whether they are in a one or two person household, and
2. the presence of dependent children in the household, for households with two or more persons.

 

Household reference person

The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.
For a person living alone, it follows that this person is the HRP.
If a household contains only one family (with or without ungrouped individuals) then the HRP is the same as the Family Reference Person (FRP).
For families in which there is generational divide between family members that cannot be determined (Other related family), there is no FRP. Members of these families are treated the same as ungrouped individuals.
If there is more than one family in a household the HRP is chosen from among the FRPs using the same criteria used to choose the FRP. This means the HRP will be selected from the FRPs on the basis of their economic activity, in the priority order: Economically active, employed, full-time, non-student Economically active, employed, full-time, student Economically active, employed, part-time, non-student Economically active, employed, part-time, student Economically active, unemployed, non-student Economically active, unemployed, student Economically inactive, retired Economically inactive, other
If some or all FRPs have the same economic activity, the HRP is the eldest of the FRPs. If some or all are the same age, the HRP is the first of the FRPs from the order in which they were listed on the questionnaire.
If a household is made up entirely of any combination of ungrouped individuals and other related families, the HRP is chosen from among all people in the household, using the same criteria used to chose between FRPs. Students at their non term-time address and short-term migrants cannot be the HRP.

 

Household reference person, age of

Age is derived from the date of birth question and is a person's age at their last birthday, at 27 March 2011. Dates of birth that imply an age over 115 are treated as invalid and the person's age is imputed. Infants less than one year old are classified as 0 years of age.
The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.

 

Household size

The size of a household is equal to the number of usual residents in the household. Visitors staying at an address do not contribute to that household's size because they are counted in the household of their place of usual residence.

 

Household spaces

A household space is the accommodation used or available for use by an individual household. A household space with no usual residents is not the same as a vacant household space because it may be a second home or holiday accommodation, or may otherwise have had visitors present on census night.

 

Household type

Household type classifies households in an alternative way to the household composition classification that is used in most standard census results.
A household is classified by the type of family present, but households with more than one family are categorised in the priority order: married couple family, same-sex civil partnership couple family, cohabiting couple family lone parent family
Within a family type a family with dependent children takes priority.
This means that in tables that use this classification the alternative definitions of married couple household, same-sex civil partnership couple household, cohabiting couple household and lone parent household are applicable.

 

Households with schoolchildren or full-time students away during term-time

Households with schoolchildren or full-time students away during term-time.
Schoolchildren and students in full-time education studying away from their family home are treated as usually resident at their term-time address. Basic demographic information only (name, sex, age, marital status and relationship) is collected at their non term-time address (their 'home' or 'vacation' address). The information on families, household size and household composition for their non term-time address does not include them.

 

Industry

The industry in which a person aged 16 to 74 works relates to their main job, and is derived from information provided on the main activity of their employer or business. This is used to assign responses to an industry code based on the Standard Industrial Classification 2007.

 

Length of residence in the UK

The length of residence in the UK is derived from the date that a person last arrived to live in the UK. Short visits away from the UK are not counted in determining the date that a person last arrived.
Length of residence is only applicable to usual residents who were not born in the UK. It does not include usual residents born in the UK who have emigrated and since returned - these are recorded in the category 'born in the UK'.

 

Living arrangements

The 'living arrangements' classification combines responses to the question on marital and civil partnership status with information about whether or not a person is living in a couple. This topic is only applicable to people in households. Living arrangements differs from marital and civil partnership status because cohabiting takes priority over other categories. For example, if a person is divorced and cohabiting, then in results for living arrangements they are classified as cohabiting.

 

Long-term health problem or disability

A long-term health problem or disability that limits a person's day-to-day activities, and has lasted, or is expected to last, at least 12 months. This includes problems that are related to old age. People were asked to assess whether their daily activities were limited a lot or a little by such a health problem, or whether their daily activities were not limited at all.

 

Long-term health problem or disability, number of people in household

This variable records the number of people in the household who have a long-term health problem or disability.
A long-term health problem or disability that limits a person's day-to-day activities, and has lasted, or is expected to last, at least 12 months. This includes problems that are related to old age. People were asked to assess whether their daily activities were limited a lot or a little by such a health problem, or whether their daily activities were not limited at all.

 

Main language

The language that is a person's first or preferred language.
This information helps central government, local authorities and the NHS to allocate resources and provide services for non-English speakers, for example English teaching and translation services. It is a better indicator than country of birth, which was previously used to forecast the additional cost of providing services to people whose first language is not English.
The data are also used to assess the impact of English or Welsh language ability on employment and other social inclusion indicators.
Information on the number of British Sign Language users helps with service planning and assists in developing policies to address the needs of the deaf community.
These statistics are used by public service providers to effectively target the delivery of their services, for example in the provision of translation and interpretation services, the availability of English language lessons, and the distribution of official information leaflets in alternative languages.

 

Main language (detailed)

The language that is a person's first or preferred language.
This information helps central government, local authorities and the NHS to allocate resources and provide services for non-English speakers, for example English teaching and translation services. It is a better indicator than country of birth, which was previously used to forecast the additional cost of providing services to people whose first language is not English.
The data are also used to assess the impact of English or Welsh language ability on employment and other social inclusion indicators.
Information on the number of British Sign Language users helps with service planning and assists in developing policies to address the needs of the deaf community.
These statistics are used by public service providers to effectively target the delivery of their services, for example in the provision of translation and interpretation services, the availability of English language lessons, and the distribution of official information leaflets in alternative languages.

 

Marital and civil partnership status

Marital and civil partnership status classifies an individual according to their legal marital or registered same-sex civil partnership status as at census day, 27 March 2011. This topic is the equivalent of the 2001 Census topic 'Marital status', but has undergone significant revision to take account of the Civil Partnership Act which came into force on 5 December 2005.
Marital and civil partnership states include: married/in a registered same-sex civil partnership separated (but still legally married/in a registered same-sex civil partnership), divorced/formerly in a registered same-sex civil partnership, or widowed/surviving same-sex civil partner. Although the term 'single' is widely used to cover people in a number of states such as divorced or separated it is not a legally recognised status and was not an option on the census questionnaire. In census results the term 'single' is used to refer only to someone who has never been married or in a registered same-sex civil partnership, which were options on the census questionnaire.

 

National identity

A person's national identity is a self-determined assessment of their own identity with respect to the country or countries with which they feel an affiliation. This assessment of identity is not dependent on legal nationality or ethnic group.
The national identity question included six tick box responses: one for each of the four parts of the UK (English, Welsh, Scottish, Northern Irish), one for British, and one for 'other'. Where a person ticked 'other' they were asked to write in the name of the country. People were asked to tick all options that they felt applied to them. This means that in results relating to national identity people may be classified with a single national identity or a combination of identities.

 

NS-SeC (National Statistics Socio-economic Classification)

The National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) provides an indication of socio-economic position based on occupation. It is an Office for National Statistics standard classification. To assign a person aged 16 to 74 to an NS-SeC category their occupation title is combined with information about their employment status, whether they are employed or self-employed and whether or not they supervise other employees. Full-time students are recorded in the 'full-time students' category regardless of whether they are economically active or not. The rebased version of NS-SeC used in census results uses occupation coded to SOC2010. Information about the classification is available: NS-SeC
In 2011 Census results, because the census did not ask a question about the number of employees at a person's workplace, the reduced method of deriving NS-SeC (which does not require this information) is used.

 

NS-SeC (National Statistics Socio-economic Classification) of household reference person

The National Statistics Socio-economic Classification (NS-SeC) provides an indication of socio-economic position based on occupation. It is an Office for National Statistics standard classification. To assign a person aged 16 to 74 to an NS-SeC category, their occupation title is combined with information about their employment status, whether they are employed or self-employed, and whether or not they supervise other employees. Full-time students are recorded in the 'full-time students' category regardless of whether they are economically active or not. The rebased version of NS-SeC used in census results uses occupation coded to SOC2010. Information about the classification is available: NS-SeC .
In 2011 Census results, because the census did not ask a question about the number of employees at a person's workplace, the reduced method of deriving NS-SeC (which does not require this information) is used.
The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.

 

Occupation

A person's occupation relates to their main job and is derived from either their job title or details of the activities involved in their job. This is used to assign responses to an occupation code based on the Standard Occupational Classification 2010 (SOC2010).

 

Occupation (minor groups)

A person's occupation relates to their main job and is derived from either their job title or details of the activities involved in their job. This is used to assign responses to an occupation code based on the Standard Occupational Classification 2010 (SOC2010).

 

Occupation of household reference person

Occupation of Household reference person A person's occupation relates to their main job and is derived from either their job title or details of the activities involved in their job. This is used to assign responses to an occupation code based on the Standard Occupational Classification 2010 (SOC2010).

The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.

 

Parents working, number of

Number of parents working

 

Passports held (principle)

Results for 'passports held' classify a person according to the passport or passports they held at the time of the 2011 Census. People were asked to indicate whether they held no passport, a United Kingdom passport, an Irish passport or a passport from another country, and write in the name of the other country if applicable. If more than one of the options were applicable, people were asked to indicate all that applied.
In results that classify people by passports held, those who hold a United Kingdom or Irish passport, and any other type of passport, will appear in each applicable category. The categories 'EU countries' and 'non-EU countries' relate to the European Union (EU) as at March 2011.
This topic counts each person only once, therefore people only appear in one category even if they hold more than one passport. In cases where a person recorded having more than one passport, they were categorised in the following priority order: 1. UK passport, 2. Irish passport, 3. Other passport.

 

Passports held, total

Results for 'passports held' classify a person according to the passport or passports they held at the time of the 2011 Census. People were asked to indicate whether they held no passport, a United Kingdom passport, an Irish passport or a passport from another country, and write in the name of the other country if applicable. If more than one of the options were applicable, people were asked to indicate all that applied.
In results that classify people by passports held, those who hold a United Kingdom or Irish passport, and any other type of passport, will appear in each applicable category. The categories 'EU countries' and 'non-EU countries' relate to the European Union (EU) as at March 2011.

 

Qualification, highest level of

The highest level of qualification is derived from the question asking people to indicate all types of qualifications held. People were also asked if they held foreign qualifications and to indicate the closest equivalent.
There were 12 response options (plus 'no qualifications') covering professional and vocational qualifications, and a range of academic qualifications These are combined into five categories for the highest level of qualification, plus a category for no qualifications and one for other qualifications (which includes vocational or work-related qualifications, and for foreign qualifications where an equivalent qualification was not indicated).

No Qualifications: No academic or professional qualifications.
Level 1 qualifications: 1-4 O Levels/CSE/GCSEs (any grades), Entry Level, Foundation Diploma, NVQ level 1, Foundation GNVQ, Basic/Essential Skills.
Level 2 qualifications: 5+ O Level (Passes)/CSEs (Grade 1)/GCSEs (Grades A*-C), School Certificate, 1 A Level/ 2-3 AS Levels/VCEs, Intermediate/Higher Diploma, Welsh Baccalaureate Intermediate Diploma, NVQ level 2, Intermediate GNVQ, City and Guilds Craft, BTEC First/General Diploma, RSA Diploma Apprenticeship.
Level 3 qualifications: 2+ A Levels/VCEs, 4+ AS Levels, Higher School Certificate, Progression/Advanced Diploma, Welsh Baccalaureate Advanced Diploma, NVQ Level 3; Advanced GNVQ, City and Guilds Advanced Craft, ONC, OND, BTEC National, RSA Advanced Diploma.
Level 4+ qualifications: Degree (for example BA, BSc), Higher Degree (for example MA, PhD, PGCE), NVQ Level 4-5, HNC, HND, RSA Higher Diploma, BTEC Higher level, Foundation degree (NI), Professional qualifications (for example teaching, nursing, accountancy).
Other qualifications: Vocational/Work-related Qualifications, Foreign Qualifications (Not stated/ level unknown).

 

Qualifications gained

The qualifications classification counts all of the academic or vocational/professional qualifications that a person has obtained, for example A levels, diploma, apprenticeship, nursing or accountancy qualifications. People were asked to tick all of the categories applicable to their qualifications. People were also asked if they held foreign qualifications and to indicate the closest equivalent qualifications from the other categories listed. People who did this are counted in both the 'foreign qualifications' category and any other applicable category equivalent to their foreign qualifications.

 

Religion

This is a person's current religion, or if the person does not have a religion, 'no religion'. No determination is made about whether a person was a practicing member of a religion. Unlike other census questions where missing answers are imputed, this question was voluntary, and where no answer was provided the response is categorised as 'not stated'.

 

Religion (detailed)

This is a person's current religion, or if the person does not have a religion, 'no religion'. No determination is made about whether a person was a practicing member of a religion. Unlike other census questions where missing answers are imputed, this question was voluntary, and where no answer was provided the response is categorised as 'not stated'.

 

Religion of household reference person

Religion of Household reference person This is a person's current religion, or if the person does not have a religion, 'no religion'. No determination is made about whether a person was a practicing member of a religion. Unlike other census questions where missing answers are imputed, this question was voluntary, and where no answer was provided the response is categorised as 'not stated'.
The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.

 

Residence type

This defines the type of residence that a person lives in. It categorises people as living in a household or living in a communal establishment. People who filled in the normal household questionnaire were recorded as living in a household. Those that filled in an individual questionnaire were asked what type of accommodation they lived in, i.e. whether it was a household or a communal establishment.

 

Resident type

This defines the type of residence that a person lives in. It categorises people as living in a household or living in a communal establishment.

 

Rooms, number of

The number of rooms in a household's accommodation. The definition of a room does not include bathrooms, toilets, halls or landings, or rooms that can only be used for storage. All other rooms, for example kitchens, living rooms, bedrooms, utility rooms, studies and conservatories are counted. If two rooms have been converted into one they are counted as one room. Rooms shared between a number of households, for example a shared kitchen, are not counted. The number of rooms is not available for household spaces with no usual residents.

 

Rooms, number of persons per room in household

The number of persons per room is equal to the number of usual residents in a household divided by the number of rooms in that household's accommodation. The definition of a room does not include bathrooms, toilets, halls or landings, or rooms that can only be used for storage. All other rooms, for example kitchens, living rooms, bedrooms, utility rooms, studies and conservatories are counted. If two rooms have been converted into one, they are counted as one room. Rooms shared between a number of households, for example a shared kitchen, are not counted.

 

Rooms, occupancy rating

Occupancy rating provides a measure of whether a household's accommodation is overcrowded or under occupied. There are two measures of occupancy rating, one based on the number of rooms in a household's accommodation, and one based on the number of bedrooms. The ages of the household members and their relationships to each other are used to derive the number of rooms/bedrooms they require, based on a standard formula. The number of rooms/bedrooms required is subtracted from the number of rooms/bedrooms in the household's accommodation to obtain the occupancy rating. An occupancy rating of -1 implies that a household has one fewer room/bedroom than required, whereas +1 implies that they have one more room/bedroom than the standard requirement.

 

Schoolchildren and full-time students, age of

Age is derived from the date of birth question and is a person's age at their last birthday, at 27 March 2011. Dates of birth that imply an age over 115 are treated as invalid and the person's age is imputed. Infants less than one year old are classified as 0 years of age.

 

Second address

A second address is an address at which a person stays for more than 30 days per year that is not a person's place of usual residence. This includes addresses that are in the UK and those outside the UK.
Typical second addresses include armed forces bases, addresses used by people working away from home, a student's home address, the address of another parent or guardian, or a holiday home.
If a person with a second address was staying at that address on census night, they were classed as a visitor to that address, but counted as a usual resident at their home address.

 

Second address location

The location of the second address.
A second address is an address at which a person stays for more than 30 days per year that is not a person's place of usual residence. This includes addresses that are in the UK and those outside the UK.
Typical second addresses include armed forces bases, addresses used by people working away from home, a student's home address, the address of another parent or guardian, or a holiday home.
If a person with a second address was staying at that address on census night, they were classed as a visitor to that address, but counted as a usual resident at their home address.

 

Second address type

The type of second address
A second address is an address at which a person stays for more than 30 days per year that is not a person's place of usual residence. This includes addresses that are in the UK and those outside the UK.
Typical second addresses include armed forces bases, addresses used by people working away from home, a student's home address, the address of another parent or guardian, or a holiday home.
If a person with a second address was staying at that address on census night, they were classed as a visitor to that address, but counted as a usual resident at their home address.

 

Sex

The classification of a person as either male or female.

 

Social grade of household reference person, approximated

Social grade is a socio-economic classification used by market research industries to analyse spending habits and consumer attitudes. The classification is approximated from information collected in the 2011 Census using a method defined by the Market Research Society. A person's approximated social grade is based primarily on their occupation but also includes information about their employment status, qualifications gained, tenure and whether they work full-time, part-time or are not working. Using this information a person living in a household can be classified in one of the following categories of social grade.
Approximated social grade AB Higher and intermediate managerial / administrative / professional occupations.
Approximated social grade C1 Supervisory, clerical and junior managerial / administrative / professional occupations.
Approximated social grade C2 Skilled manual occupations.
Approximated social grade DE Semi-skilled and unskilled manual occupations, Unemployed and lowest grade occupations.
The concept of a Household Reference Person (HRP) was introduced in the 2001 Census (in common with other government surveys in 2001/2) to replace the traditional concept of the 'head of the household'. HRPs provide an individual person within a household to act as a reference point for producing further derived statistics and for characterising a whole household according to characteristics of the chosen reference person.

 

Tenure

Tenure provides information about whether a household rents or owns the accommodation that it occupies and, if rented, combines this with information about the type of landlord who owns or manages the accommodation.

 

Travel to work, means of

The means of travel used for the longest part, by distance, of the usual journey to work. This topic is only applicable to people who were in employment in the week before the census.

 

Unit

The unit is for a particular count (e.g. people or households)

 

Usual resident population

The main population base for statistics from the 2011 Census is the usual resident population as at census day, 27 March 2011. Although the population base for enumeration included non-UK born short-term residents, this population is analysed separately and is not included in the main outputs from the 2011 Census.
All statistics, unless specified, are produced using only usual residents of the UK. For 2011 Census purposes, a usual resident of the UK is anyone who, on census day, was in the UK and had stayed or intended to stay in the UK for a period of 12 months or more, or had a permanent UK address and was outside the UK and intended to be outside the UK for less than 12 months. For information about the main population base for statistics, how other population sub-groups are counted, and all variable definitions, see information about variables and classifications

 

Welsh household composition

Welsh household composition Household composition classifies households according to the relationships between the household members.
Households consisting of one family and no other usual residents are classified according to the type of family (married, same-sex civil partnership or cohabiting couple family, or lone parent family) and the number of dependent children. Other households are classified by the number of people, the number of dependent children, or whether the household consists only of students or only of people aged 65 and over.
This definition is used in most results from the 2011 Census. In a small number of results an alternative classification is used that defines households by the age of the household members. It takes no account of the relationships between them. In results where this different definition is used it is clearly indicated.
It also contains information on the number of persons in the household who can speak welsh.
Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh household composition, extended

Extended Welsh household composition Household composition classifies households according to the relationships between the household members.
Households consisting of one family and no other usual residents are classified according to the type of family (married, same-sex civil partnership or cohabiting couple family, or lone parent family) and the number of dependent children. Other households are classified by the number of people, the number of dependent children, or whether the household consists only of students or only of people aged 65 and over.
This definition is used in most results from the 2011 Census. In a small number of results an alternative classification is used that defines households by the age of the household members. It takes no account of the relationships between them. In results where this different definition is used it is clearly indicated.
It also contains information on the number of persons in the household who can speak welsh and their sex.
Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh language profile

This 'Welsh language profile' classifies usual residents aged 3 and over by Welsh language skills, for Wales as at census day, 27 March 2011. People with skills in Welsh are further categorised by key age groups.

Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh language skills

A person aged three and over is classified with skills in Welsh if they can do one or more of the following: understand spoken Welsh, speak Welsh, read Welsh, or write Welsh. In results that classify people by Welsh language skills a person may appear in more than one category depending on which combination of skills they have.

Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh language skills (detailed)

A person aged three and over is classified with skills in Welsh if they can do one or more of the following: understand spoken Welsh, speak Welsh, read Welsh, or write Welsh. In results that classify people by Welsh language skills a person may appear in more than one category depending on which combination of skills they have.

Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh speakers, number of people in household who can

Number of people in household aged 3 and over who can speak Welsh
Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh, ability of dependent child in a family to speak welsh

Ability of dependent child in a family to speak Welsh
Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh, ability of parents to speak

Parent(s) ability to speak Welsh
Applicable to Wales only

 

Welsh, ability to speak

Ability to speak Welsh
Applicable to Wales only

 

Year last worked

Classifies usual residents aged 16 to 74 by the year they last worked, for England and Wales as at census day, 27 March 2011.

 

Year of arrival in the UK

The year of arrival in the UK is derived from the date that a person last arrived to live in the UK. Short visits away from the UK are not counted in determining the date that a person last arrived. Year of arrival is only applicable to usual residents who were not born in the UK. It does not include usual residents born in the UK who have emigrated and since returned; these are recorded in the category 'born in the UK'.

 

InFuse is part of the UK Data Service Census Support